Back to Home Page
PROFESSIONAL COLUMNS


Relationships
Weight Loss Today
Urogynecology Today
Dentistry Today
Letter from the Chairman
WebWorks
Endocrinology Today



COLUMNS BY
John May



Yes! We Are What We Eat

Letter from the Chairman

Partnering

Aging in Grace — A Process

Using “Systems Thinking” to Improve Your Outcomes

Health Care Innovation – Reinventing the Customer Experience From the Perspective of an Outsider

Would you recommend your profession?

An Opportunity — Customer Service in Healthcare

ObamaCare – Baby and Bath Water?

When Information is Important














Search Our Site


- OR -





RECENT GATHERINGS


10th Annual Ping Pong for CHARITY Fundraiser



Business to Business Expo



Aberdeen Barn – A fabulous place to celebrate!



Chesapeake Sheriff’s Office “18 Strong”



Do It For the Kids! CrossFit Krypton Hosts Compete for a Cure















Professional Columns -
Letter from the Chairman by John May





PARTNERING


Advancing a Vision Through Partnering

I believe in business partnerships, and have built many teams over 30 years. Competing squanders resources in taking customers from another company, whereas a partnership can get more done in less time at lower cost. More importantly, industry knowledge and perspectives provided by members of a good team translates into better products and services.

Click for Larger Image

Partnering printer friendly version  Printer Friendly

  Email to a Friend

Even fierce competitors in the marketplace will work together if it benefits both parties. I know from my telecommunications background that Verizon, Sprint, and ATT, the most unlikely of partners, carry each other’s traffic on their networks because to do so benefits all three parties.

Advancing a Healthcare Vision Through Partnering

There are a lot of areas in which healthcare can benefit through partnering. At the top of my list is coordinated patient care, the sharing of data in real time. The technology is available that makes the care process much more efficient as data follows the patient as he/she moves around our health system. A pretty basic concept that is out of scope for many healthcare IT organizations.

What Other Industries Have Done, and How

 
The Adjacent Possible


The “adjacent possible” is a concept described in the book Where Good Ideas Come From by Steven Johnson. New technologies get developed, then combine into larger concepts, even game changers. For example, YouTube could not have happened 10 years ago primarily because the internet was painfully slow; it took hours to download a video. YouTube’s success came when the adjacent possibilities of faster internet, ubiquitous home computers and rise in cottage industry fell into place: the right technology germinates innovation.


Integration Possible, Possible Partnerships

Integration is the holy grail of IT applications. GPS was devised and could track the where but not the mapping to plan the next “step.” When GPS was married to GIS (digital maps), the result was revolutionary, a perfect example of combining two adjacent possibilities. We have had retail systems improved by barcodes, then married to package delivery systems, all connected to the internet. Another example of integration that changed everyday life in this country; partnerships in action.


Healthcare IT Would Improve with Partnership

Today, healthcare systems are generally “closed” even from one another, captive to their one solution. For example, the most popular EHR system, called EPIC, is not “open;” it does not interoperate with other systems. Information gets isolated in EPIC’s silos, preventing sharing, which makes seamless patient care impossible across healthcare segments. Adding to healthcare’s woes, with closed systems like this upgrades become prohibitive from a cost and disruption standpoint.

Vision: I would like to see doctors, patients, hospitals, and their network of care givers have secure access to information like we have when using the Web.


Healthcare and the Adjacent Possible


So, what are the adjacent possibilities for healthcare? What can we use today to do a better job caring for patients at a lower cost? What partnerships can deliver on these possibilities?


Smart Phones and Networks - An Integrators Dream

While there is never a replacement for a physician, smartphones make ancillary healthcare needs possible via applications (apps). With personalized, secure apps, one can have basic healthcare needs met: track exercise, reorder medications, schedule appointments, view healthcare data, research concerns via the internet and get connected automatically with your doctor. Smart devices could be one of the most valuable tools to enter into our complicated health system.


Supply Chains

Supply chain management has transformed many industries by getting sales, vendors, transportation companies, and numerous other partners on the same page. This kind of interaction can be repurposed by making the  patient the central focus of the system. We can interact with a doctor, the nurse, the hospital, labs, the next doctor, the next hospital, the next lab, pharmaceutical and insurance companies, physical therapy organizations, and even aging in place systems. All chained together in real time in a... Patient Chain.


The Cloud

As a technology person, I understand the importance of data/data security. Unfortunately, valuable patient information today is only narrowly accessible, trapped inside disparate healthcare systems. Getting data into the cloud is the first step in making that data visible. Cloud technology has advanced to the point that it is the perfect partnering tool. At all times available to all partners and just as secure, if not more so, than traditional systems isolated in an IT facility at a hospital.

When data is visible, we can analyze it and determine its relevance. Patient data captured in the cloud can be accessed by other doctors in the chain. An accurate knowledge about the patient will build over time without the errors found when the same data is transcribed multiple times by different people on different systems. Think of your sign-in sheet at the doctor’s office. How many times have you filled in your data on a lengthy form when you visit a new doctor or hospital?


Event Management Systems: The Ripple Effect – and the Ability to React

In software, “event processing” analyzes the “change of state.” Is the event significant and to whom is it significant? What protocols are set in process? This software residing in the cloud would be transformative in healthcare. Imagine continually updated medical data, event processed. When something happens to a patient the results will ripple through the system and reach all the patient’s partners that need to know.

The Accountable Care Act (ACA) emphasizes population management. Managing health events would be a core component to population management by alerting the right partner in the patient care continuum (chain) when there is a problem or even a potential problem. Getting proactive will let doctors get ahead of the problem before the situation worsens - and gets more expensive.

Build a Vision, Then Leverage What is Out There

Partnering unleashes the extraordinary opportunities of the adjacent possible. Partners can expand your thinking - away from the more difficult “how” towards the more visionary “what could be.” Partnerships that have the greatest value are focused on a common vision that can be reached faster and more effectively using a team approach. They leverage the successful ideas and practices of others, opening unlimited resources.

Look for that adjacent possible everywhere.

Along with a career in innovative technology, John was a Trustee in the Johns Hopkins Health System for 15 years and earned a master’s degree in Computer Science from the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Lab. This combination of experience and education allows a broad perspective on healthcare, software and how the transfer of software platforms between industries have had a transformational impact. He believes the healthcare industry can, and should, be next.



















Along with a career in innovative technology, John was a Trustee in the Johns Hopkins Health System for 15 years and earned a master’s degree in Computer Science from the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Lab. This combination of experience and education allows a broad perspective on healthcare, software and how the transfer of software platforms between industries have had a transformational impact. He believes the healthcare industry can, and should, be next.


(703) 624-2719











Doctor to Doctor Magazine
133 Kempsville Rd.,
Chesapeake, VA 23320

Tel: (757) 547-0520













Web Site Definition & WebUpdate Showcase™ Site Management Coding © Internet Marketing and Design    
     All Website Content © Doctor to Doctor Magazine